Limousine Invention

Limousine Invention

The history of the limousine is quite interesting. It was first introduced in Paris, France in 1889. The term limousine actually comes from the French word limousin, which was a former province filled with farmland and shepherds. The locals would cover themselves in a traditional black cloak to keep warm on the chilly nights of the French countryside. Early limousines, unlike the modern ones we see today, had an open driver compartment but the passenger section had a cover. The enclosed portion of the car was said to resemble the cloaks worn by the shepherds of Limousin. Since then, the word limousine has come to refer to this type of transportation. Limos were originally used as delivery vehicles because they were able to keep freight dry and safe from harm if properly stored in the covered section. Interestingly enough, It was in the early 20th century, when U.S. President Woodrow Wilson decided to take a ride in a limousine that the perceived social image of this vehicle started changing. After President Wilson’s ride, the limousine was picked as the transportation mode of choice for important people, becoming a symbol of wealth and status. One of the best features of a limousine is the partition. This separation between the passengers and the driver allows for much-wanted privacy. Another great feature is that a limo requires having a chauffeur. Having your vehicle driven for you is seen as an indicator of privilege. That is why limos, and notably stretch limos, have traditionally been used to transport the rich and famous. From musical artists going to and from their concert venues, actors...